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Theragun vs Hyperice (2021): Comparing Top Percussion Massager Brands

The Therabody Theragun and Hyperice Hypervolt are popular massage guns that sit at different price ranges and have different designs and features, but they have a similar goal: to aid body recovery through deep tissue massage. We compare these top percussion massager brands and their 2020 releases–the Therabody Theragun PRO and the Hyperice Hypervolt Bluetooth–to help you choose the better massage gun for you.

Therabody Theragun vs Hyperice Hypervolt Comparison Chart

ModelTherabody Theragun PROHyperice Hypervolt
 Theragun PRO - All-New 4th Generation Percussive Therapy Deep Tissue Muscle Treatment Massage Gun
Hypervolt Bluetooth, Featuring Quiet Glide Technology - Handheld Percussion Massage Gun | 3 Speeds,...
PriceCheck PriceCheck Price
Battery LifeUp to 300 mins (150 mins/battery and includes two batteries)Up to 180 mins
Swappable BatteryYesNo
Weight2.9 lbs3 lbs
Speed Settings5, further speed customization available using the app3
Stall Force60lbsN/A
Amplitude16mm12mm
Attachments65
Carrying CaseYesYes
Mobile AppTherabody AppHyperice App
Warranty2 years1 year

Design and Build

The Theragun has better ergonomics and more attachments than Hyperice’s Hypervolt

Theragun-vs-hyperice-design-and-build-1
The Theragun PRO (left) and Hyperice Hypervolt (right) with their attachments

Therabody’s Theragun and Hyperice’s Hypervolt massage guns are easily distinguishable from each other. The Theragun has a triangular profile that makes it easier to hold the device in different positions. Its adjustable arm further makes it possible to reach areas on the back that are typically hard to reach when doing percussive therapy on your own. In contrast, the Hyperice Hypervolt’s handle and arm are not adjustable. It’s worth noting that many of the cheaper massage guns sport Hypervolt’s design and even have similar attachments.

The Theragun PRO has more attachments than Hyperice’s. Some are even exclusive to Theraguns, such as the wedge, cone, and supersoft attachments. Another difference between the Therabody Theragun and Hyperice Hypervolt is the material of their attachment heads. Theragun’s is made of soft closed-cell foam while Hypervolt’s is just plastic. Both percussion massagers weigh around 3 lbs.

Performance and Features

The Theragun PRO is more powerful than Hyperice’s Hypervolt and has more speed settings

The Theragun PRO (left) with its large ball attachment and the Hyperice Hypervolt (right) with its fork attachment

If you’re after a deep, intensive massage, the Theragun PRO better suits you. It delivers more power than the Hyperice and has more speed settings as well. The Hyperice Hypervolt only has three speed settings while the Theragun PRO has five. You can even fine-tune its speed on the app until you find your desired setting. With that said, the Hypervolt is also powerful, but not as much as the Theragun.

In terms of noise, both percussion massagers are quieter than most massage guns in the market. However, the Hyperice Hypervolt wins in this department. Therabody made the Theragun PRO quieter than older models, but the Hypervolt is still quieter even at the highest speed setting.

Battery Life & Additional Features

The Theragun PRO features a swappable battery and longer battery life and warranty

Therabody offers a wireless charging base for the Theragun PRO (left)

A unique feature of the Theragun PRO is its swappable battery mechanism and the two batteries that come with your purchase. Each battery runs for an impressive 150 minutes, giving you at least 300 minutes of runtime. If you run a physical therapy clinic, this comes in handy. You can even get the wireless charging base for more convenient charging. Meanwhile, the Hyperice Hypervolt has a battery life of up to three hours on a single charge.

In terms of portability, the Hyperice Hypervolt slightly edges out the Theragun. Both come with a carrying case for their attachments, but only the Hypervolt’s handle can be detached for easier storage. At the end of the day, they both weigh about the same, but Hypervolt can be stored in a more compact carrying case.

As for their warranty, the Therabody Theragun PRO offers two years of warranty while the Hyperice Hypervolt’s is only good for one year.

Verdict

The Theragun PRO and all its bells and whistles justify its higher price tag

If the cost is no object, go for the Therabody Theragun PRO. It’s more powerful, has a longer battery life, comes with exclusive attachments, and has a longer warranty period than the Hyperice Hypervolt. All the extra features and power you get with the Theragun PRO makes it worth the price jump.

If you’re on a budget, want a gentler massage, or prefer a more portable massage gun, get Hyperice’s Hypervolt instead. However, if you want to save even more, you may want to consider looking at the more affordable Pulse Fx massage gun. It has similar attachments as the Hypervolt and even comes with an adjustable arm similar to the Theragun PRO.

FAQs

๐Ÿ“Œ Which is better, the Therabody Theragun or the Hyperice Hypervolt?

The Theragun is overall better than the Hypervolt in terms of power, features, and warranty period.

๐Ÿ“Œ Is the Hyperice Hypervolt worth it?

Yes, the Hypervolt is a lot cheaper than the Theragun. However, if you want bigger savings, you may want to consider getting the Pulse Fx massage gun.

๐Ÿ“Œ Which massage gun is more powerful, the Theragun or Hyperice’s Hypervolt?

The Theragun PRO is overall more powerful and can deliver a deeper massage than the Hypervolt.

๐Ÿ“Œ Which is quieter, the Therabody Theragun or the Hyperice Hypervolt?

The Hypervolt is quieter than most Theraguns in the market. The Theragun PRO isn’t as loud as other Theragun models, but it’s still not as quiet as the Hypervolt.

Last update on 2021-07-19 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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Rhodaline Escala-Phelps

Managing Editor and Team Leader at Compare Before Buying. Writer and researcher passionate about people, product comparisons, culture, and current events.